Tag Archives: collection

A Working Vacation

Christine keeps busy with the camera, Florence loves the water, and I can't stop collecting

Christine keeps busy with the camera, Florence loves the water, and I can't stop collecting

shell garden 5

oyster shell garden

shell garden 3stone garden

Yesterday we returned to our home after our annual trip to the east coast.  We relaxed for a week at the beach in NC before heading to the woods in SC.  We look forward to these trips as an opportunity to catch up with our family, but they are also one of the most inspirational and productive times of the year for us.  Christine has been pursuing documentary photography projects at both locations for the last six years, and the project in SC is one where we collaborate.  More on that later.

I have included four images of some of my inspirations from the trip.  This year I was really taken by the worm-eaten remnants of shells, which have many of the characteristics of Chinese scholar’s rocks in miniature.  I settled for photographs in most cases, as I am trying to be increasingly selective about what I drag back to my studio.  I was also able to dig up some nice additions to my rock collection from the fill dirt around my parent’s property.  I am considering the purchase of a few tons next year just so that I can sort through it for treasures.  There are always potholes on the lane that need filling, after all.

Sticks and Stones

sc-stone-1-blog1

stone from South Carolina with carved walnut base

stone from Missouri with walnut base

stone from Missouri with walnut base

stone from South Carolina on carved pine base

stone from South Carolina on carved pine base

pine base, chip-carved to accept and stabilize the stone

pine base, chip-carved to accept and stabilize the stone

Recently I have been making bases for my growing collection of scholar’s rocks.  This is satisfying work, because the shift in context instantly elevates the observation and contemplation of the stone.  It is roughly equivalent to putting a frame on a painting.  An old trick and a simple pleasure– put a frame on anything and it gains at least the implication of importance.  This has much in common with the contemporary trend of “white box” exhibition spaces.  The gallery becomes its own framing device,  separating the art from the world by being as silent and sterile as possible.  Observing that transformation can be a little disconcerting for both the artist and the viewer.  The implication that “anything can be art” always smacks of a power grab by the incompetent, and so the questions  “what makes it good?”  and “what makes it art?” remain vital.

The conversation is further complicated in my own mind when the objects are found, not made.  My activity as an artist increasingly incorporates such “ready-mades”, and while this practice is well supported I find that I am inclined to balance aspects of collection with creation.  There is friction between the two which, at its best, can function as iron sharpening iron.  It highlights the arguments between art and craft, philosophy and activity, the spirit and the flesh.