Tag Archives: dining table

winter storm

We’re in the midst of the large winter storm that has been sweeping the country today.  We have several inches of ice pellets on the ground, and snow is expected within the hour.  Evidently there are accumulations of up to 22″ to our southwest, but those are the only reliable weather reports in this region– the ones relating events that have already happened.  The ice alone was enough for Washington University to cancel classes today, though.  I believe it’s the first time that has happened since I came to St. Louis in 1995.  I made good use of the time, building the last pieces of the dining room table.  Now all that is left is final sanding, assembly of parts, and decisions regarding the stain and finish.  You’ll still need to use your imagination to picture things right-side-up, but here are a few images:

Pedestal base top and bottom, exploded view.  I mirrored dado cuts to create the mortises.

Pedestal base top and bottom blanks, exploded view. I mirrored dado cuts to create the mortises.

Assembled pedestal before chamfering.

Assembled pedestal before chamfering.

All parts in place-- I made the central stretcher today, which has a soft curve along its bottom edge (the top edge in the photo) and a through-tenon at each end.

All parts in place-- I made the central stretcher today, which has a soft curve along its bottom edge (the top edge in the photo) and a through-tenon at each end.

Detail of the through-tenon.  It will have a maple pin that runs from top to bottom, securing it in place.

Detail of the through-tenon. It will have a maple pin that runs from top to bottom, securing it in place.

table top

I’ve managed to make some progress on our new dining room table, so here are a few images of the table top.  It’s a big one– nine feet two inches long, fifty inches wide, designed to compliment the architecture and woodwork in our dining room.  I’m currently working on the table base and finish samples.   I hope to be able to make use of the black walnut stain that I made this fall.  The long boards were a bit tricky to deal with, especially since three of them are about eleven inches wide.  As a result, one board had a slight edge flaw that prevented a clean glue-up on the last four inches or so.  I used a repair technique that I learned from a book by Tage Frid.  Simple and effective, although it is important to get the filler strip into place quickly– before the glue causes the wood to expand.

final glue-up of the top, which is composed of seven quarter-sawn white oak boards.

Final glue-up of the top, which is composed of seven quarter-sawn white oak boards.

Curves cut on short ends, just one inch of deflection across the width.

Curves cut on short ends, just one inch of deflection across the width.

I used a Japanese saw to re-cut the imperfect part of this joint, and used a sliver of the same board to make the filler strip.

I used a Japanese saw to re-cut the imperfect part of this joint, and used a sliver of the same board to make the filler strip.

Filler strip glued in place.

Filler strip glued in place.

Finished repair, trimmed and sanded.

Finished repair, trimmed and sanded.